Progress on the third floor

Happy Monday!
Got off to a great start this morning. I needed to paint the new drywall in the third floor bath (still under construction) before I went off to work on my latest painting. I got up early, stared to prime the walls and noticed a small piece of carpet on the floor. I thought it was odd, but dismissed it. Moved my ladder and with a full gallon of paint in one hand and my brush in the other, proceeded to climb. Of course the carpet was there to cover a hole in the floor where the toilet is going….the ladder went into the hole, I jumped back into the tools laying on the floor and the rest you can just imagine. I only spilled ¼ of a gallon of paint and no injury just more spatters on my hot pink sweat pants (sigh).

Well the walls are primed so I’m off to work on my roosters. Here is where I left off:image

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Seeing Red

The work on the roof continues. It looks like we have taken over the block with the trailer and the enormous work table where the roof metal standing seams are bent.

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Takeover of St Louis St

 

 

Up on the roof, it’s a continuous revelation as the metal layers are peeled away: will there be good boards underneath or a mess that needs to be replaced? We were lucky with the roof on the main part of the house, just some damage near the chimneys.

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What was waiting under the old metal

The boards get covered with a waterproof membrane.

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 Before the sheets of new roofing can come up, the old sheets need to go down

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Stacked and ready for recycling

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Old roof comes down

And now comes the pretty part!

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Tada!!

 

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Our Old Lady Gets a New Hat

Today is the day!  At 7:30 this morning a truckload of Amish workers arrived and all you can hear is clattering up on the roof. Today is the day we replace the original tin that has been held in place by bucket loads of roof paint over the years.

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Tuscan Villa Gets a new roof

The boards underneath are in surprisingly good condition!

 

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Original roof

The old tin will be recycled

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Old tin from roof

 

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Painted Entry Ceiling-part 2

We took a few days off after the house tour to recover. I haven’t cleaned that much in… I don’t’ know…ever. It was nice to have a really clean house,  for three years we’ve been living with plaster dust. No sooner do I clean it up when there is another project and it reappears. I digress however. Phase 2 of the ceiling is up!

Now how is this going to fit up there?

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Overall view of ceiling

 

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Entryway progress

We have been working like crazy to get more projects completed on the house in time for the bicentennial tour this coming Sunday. Not everything will be finished but hopefully people will enjoy seeing the work in progress.

Here is the next phase of the ceiling installation. Image

The rest of the rope lighting will go in tomorrow, and much more trim. I’m still painting panels!

Here are some details of the grotessca decoration.

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Entryway

Since we first started renovating this house 3 years ago I have been wanting to work on the grand entryway. Finally we have all the plumbing and electrical lines in place and I have the first part of the ceiling painted.

I put down a warm background color down first

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Next I put in the dark tones and worked out the composition.

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Finished up the clouds

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Added some birds

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Eric attached the panel to the ceiling this morning.

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I’ll post more pictures as we progress, for now I’m off to paint some molding….

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Internal Gutters on Historic Homes

Our house has built-in gutters also called Yankee Gutters. They were first adopted in North America during the 18th century in high-style Georgian and Federal-style buildings where refined architectural qualities were desired. These hidden gutters also served an aesthetic purpose in buildings with grandiose compositions, classical orders, and elaborate cornices. The roof and cornice line are not only extremely important elements of the architectural character of these buildings — they also play a critical role in the water-shedding function of the exterior.

Many historic buildings use internal gutters instead of external ones. Often called box gutters, internal gutters were recessed troughs constructed in the plane of the roof near the eaves. They were constructed of wood boxes with sloped bottoms, lined with metal; the first metal linings were lead. Copper became available in America by the end of the 18th century and soon became popular for its durability. The integrity of the metal lining, flashings below the edge of the roof cladding, and cap flashings are critical to the performance of built-in gutters. A common sub-category of built-in gutter, also called a boxed gutter, eaves trough, or sunk gutter, cuts through the roof itself and is lined with metal. Box gutters are advantageous because they usually have no effect on the property’s appearance since the interrupted roof plane is not visible from the ground.

Tuscan Villa

Internal Gutters

Two major disadvantages of built-in gutters is that leaks are hidden, and repairs are difficult, When deteriorated, water can enter through the structure and cause extensive damage. With proper detailing, built-in gutters can be watertight.

Our roof is being repaired by Mark Hetrich and John Henessey of The Roof Medic from Berks county. Mark, who has been a roofer for more than 25yrs, has worked on quite a few historic homes. After removing the rotting wood, they replace it with “barnboard” and plywood and cover the trough with heavy rubber. Normally the downspout sections are screwed together, however Mark is using an older method of soldering the joints and using special “rack and key” mounting brackets.   The solder that he uses  is half tin and half lead. This “bar solder” is melted with an antique soldering iron that is heated in a portable coal stove or fire pot that he made 35 yrs ago. Pretty cool isn’t it?



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